• 7 Packing Tips for Volunteers

    7 Packing Tips for Volunteers

    Packing tips for Canadians headed to the Africa Mercy suggested by the crew who know what comes in handy, and/or have found themselves in a pickle once or twice!

     

    1. If your headed to the ship long-term or are taking part in the sail to a new country, invest in a hammock. They can be hung up on deck 7 while the ship sails, creating a nice natural, relaxing swing.

     

    2. A head lamp is always a win. Since street lamps are not commonplace in Africa, venturing out at night, especially on your bike, can be a bit dangerous without any light (pot holes can be more like craters!)

     

    3. Buying inexpensive 220 V electrical hair-dryers/straighteners/any other hair styling tool is better than bringing your own to get fried (credit to Ally Jones, Africa Mercy Human Resources Manager, for the above three tips!). A side note, the ship is quite cool, so going to bed with wet hair can bring on a cold.

     

    “Be super careful of the of voltage and use of adapters –blew up my hairdryer the first time I used it!” –  AFM alumni Jane McIntosh from Sidney, BC

     

    4. Cargo pants (or capris) are GREAT for hands free storage if you’re working at or visiting locations off ship and need to bring, among other things – bug dope, sun screen and hand sanitizer (ladies light weight cargo pants can be harder to find so we hear, second hand stores can be a good place to start but if you know of any stores that sell them, comment below!). Or might we even suggest a fanny pack?

     

    5. Suitcases take up space! Try to get the duffle bag style on wheels, if possible – or at least one that collapses very flat. The space under the bunks is very small in height. If your suitcase is too fat to fit underneath…it will end up in your living room, if you have one 🙂

     

    6. Streets are usually dusty and dirty, and when it rains, muddy. Canvas material shoes/flats are a good option as you can throw them in the washing machine and they will dry quickly, but if you’re onboard for more than a couple months, it is a good idea to bring a few pairs of inexpensive flats so you can let them go when they get too grungy (also, give the soles of your shoes a wash when you come in from being around town so you don’t bring something unwanted into your cabin).

     

    7. If you’re feeling dirty at any point in the day baby wipes are great to have on hand on the ship and off.

     

    Stay tuned for more Mercy Ships tips!

     

     

  • Beautiful Straight Feet

    Beautiful Straight Feet

    MGC150917_MGC07012_SOLOFONORINA_JF0003Prinscio was two when he took his first steps, walking on the tops of his twisted feet. Born with bilateral club feet, he developed this curious gait to get around.

    He was ashamed of the way he moved, and he would declare, “Don’t talk about my feet!” to anyone who stared.

    In every other way, Prinscio simply delighted in life. “He does everything with happiness. He smiles with his whole body,” his mother Joceline says.

    Within weeks of his birth, Prinscio’s parents tried correcting his condition with Malagasy massage. A dozen “healers” gave them conflicting advice. His parents became deeply discouraged because they had spent so much money and nothing helped.

    Three years later, a medical specialist told them Mercy Ships was in Madagascar providing the exact treatment Prinscio needed – free of charge.

    MGC150917_MGC07012_SOLOFONORINA_JF0002At his first appointment, volunteer physiotherapists explained Prinscio’s club feet could be corrected by plaster casts, minor surgery, exercises and the use of night-time braces.

    The bright little three-year-old enthusiastically helped at his therapy visits saying, “I’ve got to do it!” He also chatted about his dreams, “Mamma, when my feet are fixed, I will ride a bike and play football. I will be like other kids!”

    After eight sessions and a series of eight double leg casts, Prinscio underwent a minor surgery called a tenotomy (tendon release) to attain the last degrees of correction in his feet.

    MGC160111_PRINSCIO_PAT07012_REHAB_KK0003As the day approached to finally remove his casts, Prinscio was beyond excited. His mother overheard him talking to one of his friends, “Tomorrow when I come home, my feet will be just like yours!

    On December 22nd the casts were removed, revealing beautiful straight feet. Joceline exclaimed, “This is the best Christmas gift ever!”

    Large, heavy callouses remain on the upper side of Prinscio’s small feet. It takes a moment to realize these are the “heels” he previously walked on.

    Prinscio now stands confidently, flat on the soles of his beautifully restored feet.

    Story by Sharon Walls

  • Beautiful Straight Feet

    Beautiful Straight Feet

    MGC150917_MGC07012_SOLOFONORINA_JF0003Prinscio was two when he took his first steps, walking on the tops of his twisted feet. Born with bilateral club feet, he developed this curious gait to get around.

    He was ashamed of the way he moved, and he would declare, “Don’t talk about my feet!” to anyone who stared.

    In every other way, Prinscio simply delighted in life. “He does everything with happiness. He smiles with his whole body,” his mother Joceline says.

    Within weeks of his birth, Prinscio’s parents tried correcting his condition with Malagasy massage. A dozen “healers” gave them conflicting advice. His parents became deeply discouraged because they had spent so much money and nothing helped.

    Three years later, a medical specialist told them Mercy Ships was in Madagascar providing the exact treatment Prinscio needed – free of charge.

    MGC150917_MGC07012_SOLOFONORINA_JF0002At his first appointment, volunteer physiotherapists explained Prinscio’s club feet could be corrected by plaster casts, minor surgery, exercises and the use of night-time braces.

    The bright little three-year-old enthusiastically helped at his therapy visits saying, “I’ve got to do it!” He also chatted about his dreams, “Mamma, when my feet are fixed, I will ride a bike and play football. I will be like other kids!”

    After eight sessions and a series of eight double leg casts, Prinscio underwent a minor surgery called a tenotomy (tendon release) to attain the last degrees of correction in his feet.

    MGC160111_PRINSCIO_PAT07012_REHAB_KK0003As the day approached to finally remove his casts, Prinscio was beyond excited. His mother overheard him talking to one of his friends, “Tomorrow when I come home, my feet will be just like yours!

    On December 22nd the casts were removed, revealing beautiful straight feet. Joceline exclaimed, “This is the best Christmas gift ever!”

    Large, heavy callouses remain on the upper side of Prinscio’s small feet. It takes a moment to realize these are the “heels” he previously walked on.

    Prinscio now stands confidently, flat on the soles of his beautifully restored feet.

    Story by Sharon Walls

  • Beautiful Straight Feet

    Beautiful Straight Feet

    MGC150917_MGC07012_SOLOFONORINA_JF0003Prinscio was two when he took his first steps, walking on the tops of his twisted feet. Born with bilateral club feet, he developed this curious gait to get around.

    He was ashamed of the way he moved, and he would declare, “Don’t talk about my feet!” to anyone who stared.

    In every other way, Prinscio simply delighted in life. “He does everything with happiness. He smiles with his whole body,” his mother Joceline says.

    Within weeks of his birth, Prinscio’s parents tried correcting his condition with Malagasy massage. A dozen “healers” gave them conflicting advice. His parents became deeply discouraged because they had spent so much money and nothing helped.

    Three years later, a medical specialist told them Mercy Ships was in Madagascar providing the exact treatment Prinscio needed – free of charge.

    MGC150917_MGC07012_SOLOFONORINA_JF0002At his first appointment, volunteer physiotherapists explained Prinscio’s club feet could be corrected by plaster casts, minor surgery, exercises and the use of night-time braces.

    The bright little three-year-old enthusiastically helped at his therapy visits saying, “I’ve got to do it!” He also chatted about his dreams, “Mamma, when my feet are fixed, I will ride a bike and play football. I will be like other kids!”

    After eight sessions and a series of eight double leg casts, Prinscio underwent a minor surgery called a tenotomy (tendon release) to attain the last degrees of correction in his feet.

    MGC160111_PRINSCIO_PAT07012_REHAB_KK0003As the day approached to finally remove his casts, Prinscio was beyond excited. His mother overheard him talking to one of his friends, “Tomorrow when I come home, my feet will be just like yours!

    On December 22nd the casts were removed, revealing beautiful straight feet. Joceline exclaimed, “This is the best Christmas gift ever!”

    Large, heavy callouses remain on the upper side of Prinscio’s small feet. It takes a moment to realize these are the “heels” he previously walked on.

    Prinscio now stands confidently, flat on the soles of his beautifully restored feet.

    Story by Sharon Walls

  • Join us for a Unique Experience in the Shipyard!

    Join us for a Unique Experience in the Shipyard!

    As we begin our approach toward the Spring/Summer and the end of the current field service, Mercy Ships is looking for skilled and non-skilled volunteers to volunteer during dry dock!

    What is dry dock? Take a moment and watch the following video for a better idea of what volunteering during this time looks like.


    Although the hospital is closed for this part of the year, it is an extremely important aspect to what we do.

    What positions are we looking to fill?

    – Plumbers

    – Electricians

    – Welders

    – Carpenters

    – Painters

    – General Labourers

    – Sheet Metal Workers

    – Project Assistant (marine operations, responsible for assisting Project Manager with installations of structure, fittings and equipment)

    Do you have questions? Join our online community mymercy and discuss volunteering with alumni, current volunteers and staff from around the world!

    Dates for the shipyard period this year are approximately 15 June – 22 July, 2016 in Durban, South Africa.

    A new chapter in your life awaits! Click HERE to submit your volunteer application.

Page 20 of 35« First...10...1819202122...30...Last »